Termination of child support in divorce


Does your child support order specifically reference a reduction or termination date? If you don’t know, you should definitely review the order. If the child support order was entered before October 1, 2010, it is very possible the reduction or termination date was not included. We can help you obtain a clear order identifying when the child support obligation will end whether your divorce was in Fort Myers, Cape Coral, Bonita Springs, or elsewhere.

Child support, when does it terminateUnless parents agreed otherwise, child support generally terminates on a child’s 18th birthday or between the ages of 18 and 19 if the child is enrolled in high school with a reasonable expectation of graduating from high school before the age of 19, whichever is later. If you have more than one child, the child support obligation will change with each child’s emancipation.

Child support orders are now required to include a termination and reduction dates and a schedule stating the amount of the monthly child support obligation for all the minor children at the time of the order and the amount of child support that will be owed for any remaining children after one or more of the children are no longer entitled to receive child support.

If your child support order does not include a termination date, you will likely find that the child support obligation did not automatically terminate upon the child’s emancipation. We have helped numerous clients who began receiving failure to pay notices from the Department of Revenue after their child emancipated. Ideally you will want to have the child support order modified by a divorce attorney prior to any child’s emancipation. This will ensure that you won’t have to continue to make payments to the other parent after the child’s emancipation.

Have questions about infidelity and alimony? Email Keith@AttorneyGrossman.com, or call toll free: 877-687-1392, or locally: 239-210-7516.

Interested in learning more about the emotions that can surface during a divorce, read my free e-book, “Does Every Divorce Need a Shark?”

Does Every Divorce Need a Shark


Prenuptial agreement can enhance your love life


The headline might seem counterintuitive, but stay with me here. When Cupid’s arrows are flying around, drafting a “prenup” is probably the last thing on your mind. But for some people it can actually be a most romantic gift between spouses-to-be.

Prenuptial agreement attorneyOne of the requirements of preparing a successful prenuptial agreement is to put all your cards on the table, so to speak. When you demonstrate the trust required to be completely transparent with your financial situation, including all your property and debt, it can be a real relationship builder. Likewise, when your betrothed gives you full disclosure, including the contents of any will or estate planning documents, you can then both focus on building your relationship.

Finances aren’t the only thing to disclose. Prenups give couples an opportunity to discuss ideas for their future family and what roles each party sees themselves playing in the marriage. For example, it is important to know whether your finance wishes to have children or wants to pursue being a stay-at-home parent for a time.

A prenuptial agreement does not amount to betting against a relationship. Instead, it can provide a peace of mind that gives couples a strong foundation, so they can let their relationship grow naturally, consider the future in a clear-headed manner and make decisions that benefit the union.

For many couples, one of those decisions is an expertly crafted premarital agreement. We can help you decide if it’s the right choice for you and your marriage and help you understand the process and costs.

Learn more about prenuptial agreements.

Have questions about infidelity and alimony? Email Keith@AttorneyGrossman.com, or call toll free: 877-687-1392, or locally: 239-210-7516.

Interested in learning more about the emotions that can surface during a divorce, read my free e-book, “Does Every Divorce Need a Shark?”

Does Every Divorce Need a Shark


Dealing with a difficult ex during divorce


Communication problems are often at the root of a couple’s decision to divorce. Even when the marriage ends, the conflict can continue because generally the couple hasn’t been able to successfully mend their miscommunication.

Dealing with difficult ex

Image courtesy of photostock at FreeDigitalPhotos.net.

Resentment and other unresolved feelings have a way of sneaking into your interactions with your former spouse or significant other. This is especially true when children are involved. You can’t reasonably expect to effectively parent your children if there is little to no communication with the other parent. In some relationships, one or more of the parties can be identified as being “high-conflict” or just a plain jerk.

Here are some tactics to be mindful of in your interactions with your ex:

  • Don’t take it personally. Easier said than done, yes, but high-conflict individuals use conflict as a tool to keep you involved in their lives. Don’t make it easy for them to do that.
  • Remember Bill Eddy’s acronym BIFF – Brief, Informative, Firm, and Friendly. Strive to achieve communications with your ex or any other high-conflict person by following these four adjectives. Bill Eddy is co-founder and president of the High Conflict Institute.
  • Refrain from admonishing the other person. No matter how satisfying the admonishments may feel in the moment, the feeling is fleeting. Just because the other person dealt you a full hand of personal attacks doesn’t justify you doing the same. Try employing the golden rule, “treat others as you would like others to treat you.”
  • Employ active listening techniques. Think before you respond. You want to avoid instantly responding or decide not to respond. This might mean taking a few deep breaths before answering a request or question. If you’re truly interested in reducing conflict, consider whether you’re motivated to respond only to prove yourself right.
  • Bill Eddy also suggests refraining from apologizing to high-conflict people because it can have the effect of reinforcing their belief that the problem is entirely your fault.
  • Consider the services of a mediator or parenting coordinator, who can help resolve conflicts and develop plans that both parties can agree on.

For more information on divorce and family law issues, email Keith@AttorneyGrossman.com, or call toll free: 877-687-1392, or locally: 239-210-7516.

Interested in learning more about the emotions that can surface during a divorce, read my free e-book, “Does Every Divorce Need a Shark?”

Does Every Divorce Need a Shark?

 

 


Children need nurturing relationship with both parents during divorce


Children want and need a continuous and nurturing relationship with both parents. Parents should facilitate and encourage their children to spend quality time with the other parent. There are some instances where extraordinary circumstances exist that prevent the children from having a healthy relationship with both parents.

Children and divorceWhen a parent discourages a relationship between a child and the other parent, prevents contact, or speaks ill of the parent in the child’s presence, it puts pressure on the child to reject the “target” parent. These tactics amount to what psychologists and family law professionals call parental alienation.

Divorce and child custody disputes bring lots of emotions to the surface, including anger, grief and resentment. It is common for families to experience a wave of emotions. It is imperative that parents learn to curb their frustrations so as to avoid robbing their children of a relationship with the other parent. “Programming” a child to reject the other parent is not an appropriate way to deal with the mixture of emotions and can be considered maltreatment of the child, and has been shown to be a source of lasting trauma.

In our practice, we have seen clients who have gone a long period of time without having access to or even communication with their child because of the other parent’s action. This kind of parental alienation can be detrimental to the long-term health, wellbeing and development of the child – even if the child insists he or she is freely choosing to forgo contact with the target parent. Consider scheduling appointments for your children to meet with a mental health provider to help them better cope with the changes.

If you are concerned that your relationship with your child is being undermined by the other parent or if you recognize that you have been employing these tactics yourself, even subconsciously, we can help you find resources to protect your child and get the parent-child relationships back on track. One resource you may find helpful is our Parenting Performance Agreement.

For more information on divorce and family law issues, email Keith@AttorneyGrossman.com, or call toll free: 877-687-1392, or locally: 239-210-7516.

Interested in learning more about the emotions that can surface during a divorce, read my free e-book, “Does Every Divorce Need a Shark?”

Does Every Divorce Need a Shark?